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Best Of The Border (12/16-12/20)

The Chavez family of Ciudad Juárez started their own welding shop in their backyard thanks to a series of micro loans partially funded by U.S. tax dollars.
Mónica Ortiz Uribe
The Chavez family of Ciudad Juárez started their own welding shop in their backyard thanks to a series of micro loans partially funded by U.S. tax dollars.

Court Sides With Fronteras Desk For High-Profile Border Murder Case Files

A Cochise County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that the widow of a murdered Arizona border rancher could not prevent the law enforcement report on her husband’s death from being released to the public.

The ruling was on a request for injunction that followed a Freedom of Information Act request by Fronteras Desk Senior Field Correspondent Michel Marizco.


Tristan Ahtone

A example of a Naloxone rescue kit given out by the Department of Health

Wins And Losses Seen In New Mexico's Efforts To Reduce Drug Use

For almost two decades, New Mexico has led the nation in drug overdose deaths. In 2012, nearly 500 New Mexicans died from drug overdoses. For many, opioids — such as prescription painkillers and heroin — are the drugs of choice.

Española, a small town in northern New Mexico, is often pegged as the heroin capital of the state.

“We get a lot of Percocet, Vicodin, Oxycodone, there’s so many out there, I can’t name them all, but they do it,” said Española Police Officer Dustin Chavez. “They crush it up and they snort it and then when they run out, they lead to other things.”


Same-Sex Marriage Now Legal In New Mexico

New Mexico's Supreme Court ruled Thursday gay and lesbian couples can legally marry in that state. In September, New Mexico's Association of Counties filed a petition with the Supreme Court asking for guidance on the matter. New Mexico is now the 17th state in the nation to permit gay and lesbian couples to marry.


Mónica Ortiz Uribe

The Chavez family of Ciudad Juárez started their own welding shop in their backyard thanks to a series of micro loans partially funded by U.S. tax dollars.

American Tax Dollars Change Lives In Mexican Border Cities

A little-known infusion of American tax dollars has played a part in the fight against organized crime in two Mexican border cities: Ciudad Juárez and Tijuana.

The money comes from the $1.9 billion Merida Initiative, a multinational aid pact signed by the United States and Mexico six years ago.

In a neighborhood not far from the border fence in Ciudad Júarez, a family of four staff a welding shop in the backyard of their home. A series of micro loans dispensed by a local nonprofit made this business possible.

"I think it's really good because I didn't have to go outside and be in danger,” said daughter Sonia Chavez.

View the video.


Immigration Reform's Prospects In 2014

Members of the House of Representatives left Washington without passing immigration reform. So what are the chances for next year?