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It's Alive! Frankenstein's Influence 200 Years Later

(Photo courtesy Bob Beard)
The exhibit at ASU’s Hayden Library.

You probably recognize that as one of the most iconic scenes of the classic movie "Frankenstein."

This summer is the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s idea that eventually became the novel.

"It was this time of environmental crisis and social upheaval among the Industrial Revolution and it spawned this amazing story," said Bob Beard, a spokesman with ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination. "Some say it's the very first science fiction story."

A new exhibit at ASU’s Hayden Library is examining the history and cultural impact of the book, as well as how it relates to today, and what our modern-day monsters are.

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Sarah Ventre produces KJZZ’s two-hour daily program, The Show. Prior to working at KJZZ, she was a producer and editor at NPR headquarters in Washington for a number of shows, desks, podcasts and the national newscast. Her reporting ranges from understanding the relationship between faith, culture, and community among those who have left the FLDS church, to political implications of world music showcases at SXSW. Ventre’s work has been featured on Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, and on member station WAMU. Ventre also freelances for the Phoenix New Times, Bitch magazine, and several other publications. Ventre grew up in the Valley and is a founder of the nonprofit organization Girls Rock! Phoenix, which puts on a rock ’n’ roll camp for girls, trans, and gender nonconforming youths every summer. She also participates in live storytelling events, and occasionally performance art. Ventre holds a degree in anthropology from Arizona State University. She is always up for a good laugh or a great chile relleno, and is happy to have returned to her hometown to tell stories within her community.