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Peoria Finalizes New City Council District Map

The finalized redistricting map for Peoria.
(Courtesy of Jen Stein - Peoria)
The finalized redistricting map for Peoria.

The city of Peoria changes district boundaries every 10 years after a census count and the latest map has been finalized.

All six council districts in Peoria will change in some way for the 2018 City Council election.

The census showed a 5 percent population increase from 2010 to 2015, mostly in Peoria’s northern region.

In the new map, for example, the Willow district will extend farther into the Mesquite district.

Peoria Deputy City Manager Julie Arendall says most Peoria residents won’t be in a different district.

“The district boundaries just shifted slightly but if someone lives in an area that is changing districts, they won’t see a change to their representative until January of ‘19,” Arendall said.

The final map was recently approved by City Council and was submitted by a Peoria citizen through the online redistricting site.

The council considered dozens of different resident-created submissions.

“We experienced the most growth in the northern part of the city in what we have as the Mesquite district," Arendall said. "But each district did experience some level of change.”

Peoria residents can find the new district map on the city’s website.

Casey Kuhn reports from KJZZ’s West Valley Bureau. She comes to Phoenix from the Midwest, where she graduated from Indiana University with a degree in journalism.Kuhn got her start in radio reporting in college at the community public radio station, WFHB. She volunteered there as a reporter and worked her way up to host the half-hour, daily news show. After graduating, she became a multimedia reporter at Bloomington's NPR/PBS station WFIU/WTIU, where she reported for and produced a weekly statewide news television show.Since moving to the Southwest, she’s discovered a passion for reporting on rural issues, agriculture and the diverse people who make up her community.Kuhn was born and raised in Cincinnati, where her parents instilled in her a love of baseball, dogs and good German beer. You’ll most likely find her around the Valley with a glass of prosecco in one hand and a graphic novel in the other.She finds the most compelling stories come from KJZZ’s listeners.