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McCain Is No On Latest ACA Repeal Legislation

In 2016, Sen. John McCain met with health care professionals in Phoenix to discuss the exit of insurers from Arizona's exchange.
Will Stone/KJZZ
/
file | staff
In 2016, Sen. John McCain met with health care professionals in Phoenix to discuss the exit of insurers from Arizona's exchange.

Sen. John McCain is a no on the GOP’s latest effort to repeal the Affordable Care.

On Friday, McCain made the announcement despite immense pressure from both sides.

In a statement, McCain said he takes no pleasure in opposing his party’s last ditch effort to gut the Affordable Care Act, but that he can’t in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy legislation. McCain had been considered a key vote that Republicans needed to win in hopes of passing the legislation before the end of the month.

While the major players in the health care industry — hospitals, doctors, insurers — have roundly criticized the bill, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Sen. Jeff Flake both favor the legislation.

New numbers from the state show Arizona could lose a third of its federal funding for its expanded Medicaid program in the first years under the legislation.

In his statement, McCain said a bill of this magnitude requires a bipartisan approach and reliable answers to its real impacts, including a score from the Congressional Budget Office.

On Friday, Ducey tweeted that he still supports the bill: "Graham-Cassidy's block grant approach is far superior to anything Washington, D.C. has proposed on healthcare policy in recent memory because it shifts dollars and decisions back to the states."

Will Stone grew up with the sounds of public radio. As a senior field correspondent, he strives to tell the same kind of powerful stories that got him into the business — whether that means trudging through some distant corner of the Sonoran Desert or uncovering an unknown injustice right down the street. Since joining the KJZZ newsroom in 2015, he has covered political scandals, fights over the future of energy, and efforts to care for some of Arizona’s most vulnerable communities. His pieces have also aired on national programs like Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Here & Now and Marketplace. Before coming to KJZZ, he reported for public radio stations in Nevada and Connecticut. Stone received his degree in English literature from Haverford College, where he also wrote about the arts and culture scene in Philadelphia. After graduating, he interned at NPR West in Culver City, California, where he learned from some of the network’s veteran reporters and editors. When he doesn’t have a mic in hand, Stone enjoys climbing mountains, running through his central Phoenix neighborhood and shamelessly promoting his cat, Barry.