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A new plan could change the way Mexican gray wolves are managed in the Southwest

A new proposal from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service could change the way Mexican gray wolves are managed in the Southwest.

The proposal says removing population limits and setting goals for genetic diversity will help the endangered species recover. 

It will allow for the release of more gray wolves into New Mexico and Arizona’s wilderness areas. It also will limit permits that allow the killing of wolves that prey on livestock. 

Even though Mexican gray wolves are the rarest subspecies of gray wolf in North America, their populations have doubled in the last five years. 

While environmentalists say the boundaries set by the service are a limiting factor, some ranchers say they are having problems protecting livestock from wolves.

The Fish and Wildlife Service will hold virtual public hearings on the changes and allow 90 days for public comment.

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