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After Mexico election, border business leaders eye more cross-border collaboration

Claudia Sheinbaum — an environmental scientist and former Mexico City mayor — is projected be Mexico’s next president and its first female leader.

Sheinbaum, an environmental scientist and the former mayor of Mexico City, is part of the Morena party — the same as Mexico’s current president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, or AMLO.

Jaime Chamberlain is a Nogales businessman with the Arizona-Mexico Commission — and a dual citizen of Mexico and the U.S.

"Coming from a family of very economically and business-minded women, I’m very, very glad to see that two women were running for the president of Mexico. I think that that’s something extremely unique and a great opportunity for Mexico," he said.

He says he hopes Sheinbaum’s administration is amenable to expanding that trade, while tackling other issues at the border, like migration and security, which he says have at times caused slowdowns in commercial traffic at the border. 

"We need to be looking at what the opportunities are in front of us. Just between Arizona and Mexico, we do about $30 billion worth of cross-border business every year," he said.

The Mexican consulates in Nogales and Tucson were not open for day-of voting on Sunday — but Mexican citizens living abroad could cast electronic and mail-in ballots if they’d registered by February. Those looking to vote in person in Arizona could go to a station set up in Phoenix. As the Arizona Republic reports, hundreds were lined up all day Sunday to cast ballots there, despite hours-long waits and high heat. Some people even arrived to wait as early as Saturday night. 

According to Mexico’s National Election Institute, more than 197,000 Mexicans cast ballots from abroad — that includes some 39,000 that were cast in-person in Arizona and at other embassy stations around the world. 

Alisa Reznick is a senior field correspondent covering stories across southern Arizona and the borderlands for the Tucson bureau of KJZZ's Fronteras Desk.Prior to joining KJZZ, she covered border and immigration at Arizona Public Media, where she was awarded a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for her coverage of Indigenous-led protests against border wall construction.Reznick started her career working in bilingual newsrooms and as a freelance journalist in Amman, Jordan. Her reporting on migration, refugees and human rights has appeared on PRX’s The World, Al Jazeera and Nova PBS, among others. As a recipient of the International Labour Organization's FAIRWAY Reporting Fellowship, she spent six months reporting on labor migration issues across Arab States.Originally from Flagstaff, she likes climbing, being outdoors and Pluto.